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To some, Corbett relished the opportunity and had even planned to play a role in managing the crisis.

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Referring to handwritten notes, Paterno told the men that his team had a run of blown calls and hard-luck injuries. For the university's leaders, the incident in the kitchen was a powerful reminder of Paterno's staying power. Sometimes, he'd draw up a list of possible successors.He said it might be hard to believe, but next year's team was only a couple of impact players from a national championship. (Urban Meyer topped it in 2011.) But after each season, Paterno changed his mind.The leaders of Penn State agreed that the coach, then 78, should retire. And he had invited Spanier, Penn State chief financial officer Gary Schultz, athletic director Tim Curley and trustee Steve Garban to his house to discuss the possibility, sources say. "Hey, fellas," Paterno said, his voice rising, "I've raised more than

Referring to handwritten notes, Paterno told the men that his team had a run of blown calls and hard-luck injuries. For the university's leaders, the incident in the kitchen was a powerful reminder of Paterno's staying power. Sometimes, he'd draw up a list of possible successors.

He said it might be hard to believe, but next year's team was only a couple of impact players from a national championship. (Urban Meyer topped it in 2011.) But after each season, Paterno changed his mind.

The leaders of Penn State agreed that the coach, then 78, should retire. And he had invited Spanier, Penn State chief financial officer Gary Schultz, athletic director Tim Curley and trustee Steve Garban to his house to discuss the possibility, sources say. "Hey, fellas," Paterno said, his voice rising, "I've raised more than $1 billion for this university -- in this kitchen. We'll get better."Sure enough, the Nittany Lions enjoyed a resurgent 2005 season, finishing with a record of 11-1.

But on the Sunday before Thanksgiving in 2004, as the men sat at Paterno's kitchen table nibbling on cookies, he instead announced he wasn't ready to go. As the accolades accumulated for the old coach's comeback, Paterno could not help telling reporters how Spanier and others had tried to force him out, while sitting at his kitchen table. Get off my backside,'" Paterno told the Pittsburgh Post-Gazette.

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Referring to handwritten notes, Paterno told the men that his team had a run of blown calls and hard-luck injuries. For the university's leaders, the incident in the kitchen was a powerful reminder of Paterno's staying power. Sometimes, he'd draw up a list of possible successors.He said it might be hard to believe, but next year's team was only a couple of impact players from a national championship. (Urban Meyer topped it in 2011.) But after each season, Paterno changed his mind.The leaders of Penn State agreed that the coach, then 78, should retire. And he had invited Spanier, Penn State chief financial officer Gary Schultz, athletic director Tim Curley and trustee Steve Garban to his house to discuss the possibility, sources say. "Hey, fellas," Paterno said, his voice rising, "I've raised more than $1 billion for this university -- in this kitchen. We'll get better."Sure enough, the Nittany Lions enjoyed a resurgent 2005 season, finishing with a record of 11-1.But on the Sunday before Thanksgiving in 2004, as the men sat at Paterno's kitchen table nibbling on cookies, he instead announced he wasn't ready to go. As the accolades accumulated for the old coach's comeback, Paterno could not help telling reporters how Spanier and others had tried to force him out, while sitting at his kitchen table. Get off my backside,'" Paterno told the Pittsburgh Post-Gazette.(function() { var a=this;var b,c,d,e,f;function g()f=e=d=c=b=! 1;var h;if(h=g())var j=c,k=f,l=d,m=e;var n;if(b&&a.opera)else k?

billion for this university -- in this kitchen. We'll get better."Sure enough, the Nittany Lions enjoyed a resurgent 2005 season, finishing with a record of 11-1.But on the Sunday before Thanksgiving in 2004, as the men sat at Paterno's kitchen table nibbling on cookies, he instead announced he wasn't ready to go. As the accolades accumulated for the old coach's comeback, Paterno could not help telling reporters how Spanier and others had tried to force him out, while sitting at his kitchen table. Get off my backside,'" Paterno told the Pittsburgh Post-Gazette.(function() { var a=this;var b,c,d,e,f;function g()f=e=d=c=b=! 1;var h;if(h=g())var j=c,k=f,l=d,m=e;var n;if(b&&a.opera)else k?

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Corbett was participating in his first meeting, but he had the last word.

Surma then asked whether any trustee objected to the firing of coach Joe Paterno. ive months after that night and two-and-a-half months after Paterno's death from lung cancer at age 85, the Penn State community's anger at the coach's dismissal might be less visible but is no less visceral.

State College faces a new round of anger when Sandusky's trial begins on June 5.

But the trustees and Paterno's supporters have never stopped fighting an intensifying battle over how he was dismissed and how he will be remembered -- a battle that could materially impact the university for years to come. The Penn State football team had finished the 2004 season with a record of 4-7. People had begun saying out loud what they had long been whispering: The game has passed Paterno by.

Remember that little boy in the shower." The voice belonged to Thomas W.