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Violet light is slowed in a glass of water significantly more than red light.

As a result shorter visual waves refract more than do longer ones.

This site, closely coupled to The Natures of the Stars and The Hertzsprung- Russell (HR) Diagram, provides an introduction to the spectra of stars and allied celestial objects.

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"Spectra" is embedded with links that will take you back to the appropriate parts of the above two sites. The classic colors red, orange, yellow, green, blue, and violet connect in a seemingly infinite number of shades, one blending smoothly into the next.

Together they constitute the "visual spectrum" (or "optical spectrum") because it is the part of the full spectrum that is seen with the human eye.

A single gamma ray photon can carry the energy of over a million million million radio photons.

Light and its partners can be manipulated in a variety of ways.

Refracted light is therefore "dispersed" or spread out into its spectrum, creating a rainbow -- or the spectrum of a star.

Spectra can also be created by the interference of light waves, the phenomenon that makes the brightly colored patterns seen reflected from a compact audio disc and the halos often observed next to a bright, partly clouded Moon.Shorter than violet you would see the ultraviolet, that which gives us tans and sunburns, and then you would encounter much more dangerous X-ray radiation and finally deadly gamma rays.Except for the energy they carry, all portions of the spectrum -- ordinary light, infrared, radio, ultraviolet -- are fundamentally the same.Though light and its partners can act like waves, at the same time they can act like a stream of particles.In a crude sense, these particles, called "photons," carry the waves.Before she was nominated for an Oscar for 2009’s Up in the Air, Anna Kendrick couldn’t even afford a pair of shoes for the film’s premiere at the Toronto International Film Festival.“I was not famous so nobody wanted to lend me shoes, but I was broke,” Kendrick tells People’s editor-in-chief Jess Cagle in the latest episode of The Jess Cagle Interview (streaming now on People TV).