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and he was living at the same address many years later."Mr Henderson told Ms Sherry of the find, who rang Mr Albanese."It's a moment I'll never forget," he said."I was in the Commonwealth Parliamentary Offices, I was about to chair a dinner of the Australian Transport Council."I got this phone call just as we were about to leave and she — it was very short conversation — she said 'we've found him', and it took my breath away because I didn't think that would happen." Now, Mr Albanese faced the dilemma of how to approach the man he believed to be his father."I knew that I had to, even if it meant knocking on the door, I knew I had to pursue it then," he said."It was very much a physical need in my gut that I needed for that to happen."Once again, Mr Albanese was able to pull some strings through contacts, this time at the Australian Embassy in Rome."As well as knowing Amanda Vanstone ...

my second cousin happened to work at the embassy [and] was in charge of the international visits at the embassy," Mr Albanese said."So we wrote, essentially, a letter to the family saying that I would be visiting and that I was the son of Mary Ellery, the late Mary Ellery, her maiden name, and that I would like to meet Carlo."Not knowing Carlo Albanese's circumstances or how he would be received, he didn't mention anything about being Carlo's son."A friend of what I now know as my brother was a lawyer and she made contact and said that she would be happy to meet with us," Mr Albanese said."I arrived in Bari and then travelled up to Barletta, that's very close, on the Saturday and we met.""Then I told her the story. I made it clear that I didn't want anything except to meet Carlo, who I thought was my father, that I wasn't there to ask for money or inheritance or anything else, I just wanted to meet him."The lawyer arranged for a meeting the very next day.

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Friends of both genders tell that their experiences have been hard in different ways.My guy friends (also educated, attractive) complain that they get no responses and female acquaintences tell me that they get so many emails, etc, that they don’t know where to start-and often do nothing.Here is what I wrote back to her: First of all, I’ve had EVERY bad dating experience you can possibly imagine.I’ve had women write me nasty emails, insult me over the phone, ignore my phone calls, stand me up, refuse to thank me for dinner, refuse to reciprocate in bed… And yet I still run around as this super dating advocate, because I believe it is the best prospect to find someone special.When my father heard I was online dating he was deeply sceptical.

He told me a story about a friend of his whose internet date had turned out to be morbidly obese as evidence that it was an avenue to be avioded at all costs.When I responded that a) There are worse things in life then having dinner with someone who you find unattractive, andb) His friend was at fault for not exchanging photos before meeting up he was totally unconvinced, and more then a tad miffed that i should question his judgement.(Bear in mind that there weren’t even PCs around he was last single) Anyway, my dad’s friend has subsequently met a great woman on the internet with whom he is in a committed relationship.And if it hasn’t happened to you yet, you can say “What’s wrong with these terrible people on these awful sites?” Or you can ask, “How can I make this work for me, despite the obvious flaws? But I’ll tell you, all it takes is one person – and you’ll be standing right with me."What I was told was that (my mother) travelled overseas, met my father, married him overseas, returned to Australia and that he died in a car accident," Mr Albanese told 7.30."That was what I was told, and from an early age, that was what I believed."But when he was about 14 or 15 years old, his mother revealed that there was actually much more to the story."We sat down just after dinner one night and she — it was very traumatic for her, I think, to tell me that in fact that wasn't the case, that my father might still be alive, that she'd met him overseas, fallen pregnant with me, had told him and he had said, basically, that he was betrothed to someone from the town in Italy where he was from."I think that whole guilt associated with having a child out of wedlock in 1963 as a young Catholic woman was a big deal and, hence, the extent to which she had gone to in terms of adopting my father's name, she wore an engagement and a wedding ring, she — the whole family just believed this story."Feeling a sense of obligation to his mother, Mr Albanese didn't follow up on details of his father until after his mother died in 2002."There was a particular time where we were visiting my mother's grave when [Albanese's son] Nathan was a little boy and he said, 'where's your Daddy? I had a responsibility to him as well — he carried the name Albanese — and to find out more about my father."So it was very much a gradual need that became ...