Dalhousie dating society

In the early 60s the Belfast Telgraph used to print a weekly report on the "Movements of Head Line ships" - I think it was on a Thursday.I've typed a copy from October 1960 (I still have the origional cutting) and this gives an insite into the Head Line at that time.

For me,as I was told, it has always been the "Head Company".

Fair Head (Capt Greene) Sailed from Montreal Oct 24 for Toronto Detroit Chicago and Milwaukee Innishowen Head (Vapt Clarke) Sailed Wilmington NC Oct 24 for Belfast dublin and Liverpool Ramore Head (Capt Davey) Due Belfast Oct 27 hence Dublin and Liverpool Rathlin Head (Capt Stark)Expected from Dalhousie Oct 25 for Montreal and Port Alfred to complete loading for Belfast Dublin and Liverpool Roonagh Head Sailed Glasgow Oct 25 for Detriot and Chicago Torr Head Expected to sail from Montreal Oct 25 for Liverpool and Belfast.

There were ships called Lord Antrim, Lord Downshire, Lord Glentoran, Lord Londonderry,and Lord O'Neill Fergus 62Lord Line was founded by Thomas Dixon not sure of the date.

is a command-line utility for searching plain-text data sets for lines that match a regular expression.

And what's more, it's completely This company was also known as the Ulster Steamship Company and G. It was first registered in 1877 and sold its last ship in 1979 although the Heyn Group may still exist. Fortunately,being neither fish nor fowl I escaped most of the mayhem. In the early 60s the Belfast Telgraph used to print a weekly report on the "Movements of Head Line ships" - I think it was on a Thursday.

The second "Orlock Head" was built by Dublin Dockyard in 1921, 1563 gross tons, dimensions 240.0 x 36.3 x 19.3 feet, powered by a triple expansion steam engine. Apart from that she was a well-found vessel,a coal burner,but the grub was of the best. I've typed a copy from October 1960 (I still have the origional cutting) and this gives an insite into the Head Line at that time.Welcome to Ships Nostalgia, the world's greatest online community for people worldwide with an interest in ships and shipping. Heyn); 28.7.40 set on fire by enemy aircraft, later sank 58.44N 04.21W there, Was looking for some family history and "stumbled" here. Has anybody of the company emploiees ever thought of opening a company web page with the history of it? Not the best situation for a peaceful trip regardless of other U-boats and such. Very appropriate I thought considering the sorry history of the place. From what I'm digging out from the net the History (& ventures) of the company It's getting very interesting. Somewhat surprising for a steam ship to last that long when the oil crisis of the early 1970's saw wholesale scrapping of such ships.Whether you are crew, ex-crew, ship enthusiasts or cruisers, this is the forum for you. Irecall one occasion when,after a night ashore the jolly firemen rolled a bale of kerosene soaked waste,on fire of course,down the ladder into the sailors fo-cstle which was in the aft tweendecks. I was thincking of getting all the possible news&pics and build a web page and in the case why not put everything on paper? Hi Recently found an old scrap book I kept as a kid before I went to sea.The Carrigan Head holds a special place in my life history because as a kid I always wanted to go to sea although there were no family ties.As the time drew close to declare my intentions to my parents (who didnt quite know how to handle this youthful dream) unbeknown to me they arranged for a visit to the Carrigan Head one Saturday.From there on it was full ahead through school and on to the Ellerman Lines (better routes than continuous N Atlantic) and I never regreted it, Fergus 62Hello Fergus, I'm Capt.